Items filtered by date: September 2021

Tuesday, 28 September 2021 00:00

What Causes Pain in the Arch of the Foot?

There are 26 bones, 30 joints, and almost 100 muscles and ligaments in the feet, and there are a variety of issues that may affect these components and lead to foot pain. Pain in different areas of the foot can be indicative of different conditions. Pain in the arch of the foot usually indicates common conditions such as plantar fasciitis, tarsal tunnel syndrome, or tibialis posterior tendonitis. Plantar fasciitis occurs when the plantar fascia, which runs along the bottom of the foot, becomes inflamed. Tarsal tunnel syndrome occurs when the tibial nerve gets squeezed or compressed where it goes through an opening in the ankle. Tibialis posterior tendonitis is an overuse injury that causes inflammation in the tibialis posterior tendon, which runs from inside the ankle to the bottom of the foot. Because of the variety of issues that lead to foot pain, patients who are struggling with foot pain should consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment.

Foot Pain

Foot pain can be extremely painful and debilitating. If you have a foot pain, consult with one of our podiatrists from Nassau Foot & Ankle. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Causes

Foot pain is a very broad condition that could be caused by one or more ailments. The most common include:

  • Bunions
  • Hammertoes
  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Bone Spurs
  • Corns
  • Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Ingrown Toenails
  • Arthritis (such as Gout, Rheumatoid, and Osteoarthritis)
  • Flat Feet
  • Injury (from stress fractures, broken toe, foot, ankle, Achilles tendon ruptures, and sprains)
  • And more

Diagnosis

To figure out the cause of foot pain, podiatrists utilize several different methods. This can range from simple visual inspections and sensation tests to X-rays and MRI scans. Prior medical history, family medical history, and any recent physical traumatic events will all be taken into consideration for a proper diagnosis.

Treatment

Treatment depends upon the cause of the foot pain. Whether it is resting, staying off the foot, or having surgery; podiatrists have a number of treatment options available for foot pain.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Oceanside, Franklin Square, and East Norwich, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 21 September 2021 00:00

What Is Fat Pad Atrophy?

The fat pad is a thick layer of fat located underneath the balls and heels of the feet. It provides cushioning to minimize the effects of friction and pressure on the feet, while also anchoring the feet to help you shift your body weight. Fat pad atrophy is the gradual loss of fat from the ball or the heel of the foot. This process is often associated with aging, but may also be caused by collapsed bones, high arches, foot injuries, arthritis, improper footwear, diabetes, steroid injections, certain medications, and genetic factors. Fat pad atrophy leads to symptoms such as pain in the balls and heels of the feet, swelling, and the formation of calluses. Pain is usually at its worst when walking, standing for prolonged periods of time, or wearing high heels. If you are experiencing fat pad atrophy, it is suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact one of our podiatrists of Nassau Foot & Ankle. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact our offices located in Oceanside, Franklin Square, and East Norwich, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 14 September 2021 00:00

Footwear Tips for Walking

Walking is a great low-impact way to lose weight, strengthen muscles, improve circulation, and more. However, it is important to use footwear designed specifically for the biomechanics of walking. Walking is done with a steady heel-to-toe stride, transferring body weight evenly from the heel to the toe. This motion begins with the heel striking the ground first, followed by a rolling motion through the heel to the toes, and then a pushing out of the stride with the toes. A good walking shoe will support and facilitate this motion in a few ways. Walking shoes should be flexible at the forefoot to allow the foot to flex during the heel-to-toe walking stride. A walking shoe should provide adequate cushioning, but not as much in the forefoot as a running shoe. This makes walking shoes lighter in weight, which help keep you comfortable. Regarding the heel, straight (or undercut) heels are best for walking shoes—as opposed to wider, higher, or flared heels in running shoes which may interfere with the walking stride. Before embarking on any fitness walking regimen, consult with a podiatrist for additional footwear/foot health advice—particularly if you have an existing medical condition.

For more information about walking shoes versus running shoes, consult with one of our podiatrists from Nassau Foot & Ankle. Our doctors can measure your feet to determine what your needs are and help you find an appropriate pair of footwear.

Foot Health: The Differences between Walking & Running Shoes

There are great ways to stay in shape: running and walking are two great exercises to a healthy lifestyle. It is important to know that running shoes and walking shoes are not interchangeable. There is a key difference on how the feet hit the ground when someone is running or walking. This is why one should be aware that a shoe is designed differently for each activity.

You may be asking yourself what the real differences are between walking and running shoes and the answers may shock you.

Differences

Walking doesn’t involve as much stress or impact on the feet as running does. However, this doesn’t mean that you should be any less prepared. When you’re walking, you land on your heels and have your foot roll forward. This rolling motion requires additional support to the feet.

Flexibility – Walking shoes are designed to have soft, flexible soles. This allows the walker to push off easily with each step.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Oceanside, Franklin Square, and East Norwich, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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The peripheral nervous system transmits signals between the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) and organs and limbs. For example, peripheral nerves would send a signal to the central nervous system regarding pain in the foot and the brain would direct the body to respond accordingly—that is, when this messaging system works correctly. In peripheral neuropathy there is damage to the peripheral nerves, which impedes this messaging system. Peripheral neuropathy is commonly caused by diabetes, but may also be present due to heredity, side effects of chemotherapy, drug or alcohol abuse, and other illnesses. Peripheral neuropathy can trigger symptoms in the feet such as numbness or an inability to perceive pain or temperature, cramping, muscle weakness, or tingling. Diabetic neuropathy can be particularly problematic as even minor cuts or abrasions can go undetected and turn into wounds or ulcers. If you are experiencing any of the symptoms listed, contact a podiatrist for a full examination and evaluation to determine if you may have peripheral neuropathy.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with one of our podiatrists from Nassau Foot & Ankle. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Oceanside, Franklin Square, and East Norwich, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease

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